by Miho Ogino

Japanese

How to put on and off a name

Miho Ogino

In Japan, there is a system called the Family Registry (koseki).  Recorded in this governmental registry is information about one’s life: birth, sex, the order of birth, marriage, divorce and death.  A newborn baby is named and then registered into the family’s registry, which in principal must remain unchanged for one’s lifetime. In addition, there is a list of certain kanji (Chinese-graph) that can be used for names. If parents pick any kanji outside of this list, the municipal office won’t accept the birth certificate.  There is also no way to register how to read (pronounce) the kanji. For instance, you can register your baby the Chinese character 右 (reads migi, meaning “right” of left/right) but you can also read the character as hidari(meaning “left”) or man’naka (meaning “center”). You see how odd the system is.

Recently, people of Gender/Sex Identity Disorder (GID) are observed to change their names, which has been accepted as an exceptional case. For those suffering from the incoherence between his or her own physical and admitted sexes, to alter a “female name” to “male name,” or vice versa, is a small window of solution. A law permitting the change of name and sex in the family registry, including sex-change operations, was enacted last year and enforced starting July 2004. Nonetheless, there are many strict conditions to meet this law.  For example, the sex change request is not allowed for those married or who have children from a past marriage.  The law is not fully welcomed in society, even among the privy.

I imagine there are many people, besides those with GID, who feel uncomfortable with the names their parents have given them. In the old days of Japan, we had a wonderful custom where the name commonly changed at the turn of events—as a snake casting off its skin—such as one’s childhood to adulthood, marriage, and advancement. It is unfortunate that this superb custom was lost with the enactment of the family registry system.

I have changed my name several times. My parents named me “Mihoko.” I was born in China, and soon our family moved back to Japan when Japan was defeated in World War II. When we returned, my grandfather turned in my birth certificate in which he mistakenly wrote “Miho” instead of “Mihoko.” In my childhood, I hated the name on the family registry.  I came to believe that my true name was “Mihoko” and wanted to push through it.  My family name was “Takimoto,” which I also disliked for the look and solemn feeling in its sound. For this reason, I was pleased when I got married and changed my maiden name to “Ogino.”  Meanwhile, I had children, encountered feminism, and returned back to school to major in women’s history. When I started publishing as a young scholar, I found that the prudish impression of the “Mihoko Ogino” did not fit my spirit. I found that my identity had changed from “Mihoko” to “Miho” without my knowing it. I did not get along with my husband, split with him eventually, but still I arranged the paperwork to keep my married name. Divorced, I started my new life as “Miho Ogino,” finally convinced that my inner- and outer-selves had become identical.  I was deeply pleased with this as much as the divorce.

The only inconvenience of this name is that it is often confused with “Hagino” [the Chinese character of “ogi” and “haji” are quite similar: 荻 (ogi)  and 萩 (hagi)]. I continually have had to spend some energy to correct the confusion, which felt no good, as if I were squeamish.  In a sense I have been blaming Miho “Hagino” for this reason.

One day, I received an email from Mexico out of blue. It was from a woman named “Miho Hagino” with whom I’ve always been mistaken. She said that besides she, there is another “Miho Hagino,” and asked me to join them by contributing an essay to an upcoming art exhibition of theirs.  She explained that she too was often mistaken for Miho Ogino. I took the offer due to a sort of responsibility.  I have not met the two Miho Haginos, but seen some of their works on the internet.

The world they are living and working is so different from mine. But I wonder, among the many turning points in my life, if I have taken different directions only once or twice, I might be living completely different lives in completely different places. This thought amuses me.

Some while ago, I read an article about a man named Hirokazu Tanaka, who found a dozen people with the same family and given name, and visited two of them.  In describing the feeling, Mr. Tanaka said, “It is not me but also it is me. It is somewhat a subtle sensation that my ego is pervading.” “Yes, right on!” I nodded.

Looking back, I have been “Miho Ogino” as if it were a single coat that I’ve had for a while now. Perhaps, though, a day might come to take off one or two layers of myself.


名前の脱ぎ方、着替え方

荻野美穂

日本では「戸籍」という制度があって、そこにはある人の誕生、性別、出生の順番、結婚、離婚、死亡にいたるまで、一生が記録されることになっている。新しく生まれた赤ん坊は名前をつけられて、戸籍に登録される。そのときに決まった名前は、基本的には一生変えられない。そのうえ名前に使ってもよい漢字というのも決められていて、親が子どもにそこに含まれていない字を使った名前をつけると、役所で出生届を受け取ってもらえない。それでいて、戸籍には名前をどう読むか(発音するか)は書かれないので、たとえば「右」と名前をつけて「ひだり」と読んだって「まんなか」と読んだってかまわないという、ヘンテコな制度なのだ。

最近、例外的に名前の変更が認められるケースとして日本で注目されているのは、性同一性障害(GID)の人たちである。戸籍に登録された性別と性自認(自分が女/男、どちらのカテゴリーに属していると感じるか)とが合わないために苦しむGIDの人々は、これまでも通称を「女の名前」から「男の名前」(あるいはその逆)に着替えることで、せめてもの矛盾の解決をはかってきた。昨年ようやく、性転換手術など一定の条件を満たしていれば戸籍上の性別変更を認める法律が成立し、2004年7月から施行されて、名前の変更もおこなえるようになった。もっとも、現に結婚している人や、過去の結婚で子どものいる人には性別変更を認めないというふうに、あれこれ厳しい条件がついているので、当事者のあいだでもこの法律の評判はあまりよくない。

でも世の中には、GIDではないけれど、親が勝手につけた自分の名前がどうもしっくりこないと感じている人も少なくないだろう。昔の日本には、子ども時代の幼名を成人になるときに新しい名前に変えたり、結婚や出世を機会に改名したりという、ヘビの脱皮のような便利な習慣があったのに、戸籍制度の確立によって失われてしまったのは、とても残念な気がする。

じつは私はこれまでに何度か、名前を着替えてきた。生まれたとき、両親がつけた名前は「美穂子」だった。生まれたのは中国で、第二次大戦で日本が負けたため、生後すぐに日本に引き揚げてきた。帰国してから祖父が私の出生届けを役場に出しにいき、間違って「美穂」と届けてしまった。でも子ども時代の私はこの戸籍上の名前がいやで、自分は本当は「美穂子」なんだと思い、ふだんはずっとそれで通していた。苗字は「滝本」だったが、これも字や発音の硬い感じが好きではなかった。だから結婚して夫の姓の「荻野」に変わったときは嬉しかった。子どもを産んだあと、フェミニズムに出会い、大学院で女性史の勉強を始めた。研究者の卵として論文を書くようになったら、「荻野美穂子」という名前の持つとりすました雰囲気が、自分の気分としっくり合わない気がしてきた。いつのまにか、私は「美穂子」から「美穂」に変わっていたのだ。夫ともしっくり行かなくなっていたので離婚したのだが、そのときに婚姻中の姓をそのまま使い続けるという手続きをし、私は晴れて「荻野美穂」としての道を歩き出した。自分の中身と外側とがようやくぴったり合った気がして、離婚と同じくらい、このことも嬉しかった。

ただ、この名前の問題点は、しょっちゅう「はぎの/萩野」さんと間違って呼ばれたり、書かれたりすることだ。いちいち訂正するのはけっこうエネルギーがいるし、細かいことにこだわってるみたいでいやな気分にもなる。だから世の「はぎの」さんたちに対しては、なんとなく恨めしく思っていたところがある。でもある日突然、メキシコからEメールが来た。私がいつも間違われていた「はぎのみほ」という名前の女性がいて、しかも二人も同時にいて、展覧会をするから何か文章を書いてほしいと言う。向こうもしょっちゅう「おぎのみほ」に間違われてきたのですと言われ、なんとなく責任を感じて引き受けてしまった。

お二人の「はぎのみほ」さんにはまだ会ったこともないのだけれど、作品はインターネット上でいくつか見せてもらった。私が生きているのとは、相当に違った世界。でも、人生のいくつもの曲がり角のひとつか二つを、もしも違う方向に曲がっていたとしたら、こんなふうにいろんな違った自分が、世界のいろんな場所で暮らしていたかもしれないと想像したら、得をしたような気分になった。しばらく前の日本の新聞に、田中宏和さんという男性が同姓同名の人を十数人探し出し、そのうちの二人に会いに行ったという記事が出ていた。田中さんはその気分を、「自分じゃないのに自分のような、自我が広がる微妙な感覚」と表現していて、「そうだ、そうだ」とうなづいてしまった。

思えばここしばらく私は、一枚きりのコートのように「荻野美穂」だけをまとい続けて生きてきた。でももしかしたら、そのうちもう一皮か二皮、自分を脱いでみる日が来るのかもしれない。

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s